G. Love & Special Sauce
G. Love and Special Sauce
Label ©  Sony
Release Year  1994
Length  58:22
Genre  Alternative Pop
Personal Star Rating [1-5]  
  Ref#  G-0073
Bitrate  256 Kbps
  Other  
  Info  
    Track Listing:
      1.  
      The Things That I Used To Do  
       3:35  
      2.  
      Blues Music  
       4:17  
      3.  
      Garbage Man  
       4:51  
      4.  
      Eyes Have Miles  
       5:22  
      5.  
      Baby's Got Sauce  
       3:54  
      6.  
      Rhyme For The Summertime  
       3:06  
      7.  
      Cold Beverage  
       2:34  
      8.  
      Fatman  
       4:16  
      9.  
      This Ain't Living  
       6:34  
      10.  
      Walk To Slide  
       4:28  
      11.  
      Shooting Hoops  
       3:31  
      12.  
      Some Peoples Like That  
       4:49  
      13.  
      Town To Town  
       3:33  
      14.  
      I Love You  
       3:32  
    Additional info: | top
      With Beck's unexpected commercial breakthrough, everyone's suddenly interested in a new kind of music best described as "slacker-rap." Although it uses the sing-song cadences of hip-hop, it's the polar opposite of gangsta rap; in both its laid-back delivery and self-deprecating lyrics, slacker-rap acknowledges vulnerability and failure. It was done first and best by Washington's Basehead, but it gets an invigorating twist on "G. Love and Special Sauce," the eponymous debut album from this Philadelphia trio. G. Love not only looks like Michael Stipe, but he has the same mealy-mouthed vocal delivery. If Stipe ever decided to record his first rap album with an unplugged blues trio, it'd probably sound a lot like "G. Love and Special Sauce." Recorded live with no drum machines, samples or overdubs, the album creates a fresh, distinctive sound with its odd blend of lazy rapping and funky acoustic blues. Unfortunately, G. Love's absurdist observations on life aren't as funny as those by John S. Hall of King Missle, and the laid-back minimalism of the music wears thin after a while. Only "Baby's Got Sauce," which boasts a pop hook and a valentine to a domineering woman, holds up on repeated listens. --Geoffrey Himes

      Review by Greg Prato

      Although G. Love & Special Sauce's self-titled album is their most popular (approaching gold status), it's not their best. Although there are quite a few musical surprises, the overall sound and quality of the compositions are neither as focused nor as rewarding as future releases would be. "Cold Beverage" became the band's signature tune and a fan favorite, featuring lighthearted jive lyrics and funky musical accompaniment, and its popular MTV video put them on the map. "This Ain't Living" is a precursor to the comforting Philly soul style that would be explored more thoroughly on 1997's Yeah, It's That Easy. "Town to Town" adds variety to the album with its slow-as-molasses blues style. Most of the other tracks tend to blend into each other after a while because of their similar sound and feel ("Rhyme for the Summertime," "Shooting Hoops," etc.). Even with its mishaps, G. Love & Special Sauce's debut serves as the musical foundation on which the group would build its future sound.
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