She & Him
Volume One
Label ©  Merge
Release Year  2008
Length  36:27
Genre  Alternative Folk
Personal Star Rating [1-5]  
  Ref#  S-0285
Bitrate  ~233 Kbps
  Other  
  Info  
    Track Listing:
      1.  
      Sentimental Heart  
       2:36  
      2.  
      Why Do You Let Me Stay Here  
       2:30  
      3.  
      This Is Not A Test  
       3:30  
      4.  
      Change Is Hard  
       3:03  
      5.  
      I Thought I Saw Your Face Today  
       2:50  
      6.  
      Take It Back  
       2:37  
      7.  
      I Was Made For You  
       2:30  
      8.  
      You Really Got A Hold On Me   (Smokey Robinson
       3:59  
      9.  
      Black Hole  
       2:12  
      10.  
      Got Me  
       2:45  
      11.  
      I Should Have Known Better   (Lennon/McCartney
       3:38  
      12.  
      Sweet Darlin'   (Deschanel/Jason Schwartzman
       2:40  
      13.  
      Swing Low, Sweet Chariot   (traditional
       1:37  
    Additional info: | top
      This is the musical debut from M. Ward and Zooey Deschanel, paired together by director Martin Hayens to perform the Richard and Linda Thompson tune "When I Get To The Border" for his film "The Go-Getter". Their match sparked the idea for "Volume One".

      Review by Tim Sendra

      She is actress Zooey Deschanel, Him is alt-singer/songwriter M. Ward. The two met on the set of a movie, found some musical common ground, and began working together. Volume One is the resulting album and it's one of the better albums ever made by a movie star, male or female. Good enough that it even heads off the obligatory suspicions that she only got to make a record because she was a Hollywood star. After a few spins of the album one could make a compelling case that Deschanel could quit her day job, or at least justifiably call herself an actress/musician. The common ground that the duo found and explore on Volume One is a kind of magical place where light-'60s pop meets strummy country tunes and candy-coated folk, a mythical meeting place between Sandie Shaw and Tammy Wynette with cameos by Richard & Linda Thompson. Deschanel's songs are simple and sad tales of heartbreak and missed connections, with hooky melodies and not a single artless moment to be found. For sure there's not a single instance that sounds like she got the gig because of who she is, instead of what she can do. Even if her songs were weak, her strong, assured vocals would carry the day. Sweet and rich with no annoying folky warble, she can croon ("Take It Back"), cry ("Sentimental Heart"), be playful (the bubblegum snappy "I Was Made for You"), or just sweep you off your feet with sweetness ("Sweet Darlin'," which she co-wrote with another artist who overcomes his Hollywood roots, Jason Schwartzman). As for Ward, he keeps his quirks mostly to himself, providing sympathetic backing unadorned by the kind of tricks and gimmicks that make his own albums slightly uneven. The occasional whistle here or slightly unconventional string arrangement there are the only traces of his artistry on Volume One. The rest of the time he and the band (which includes the ubiquitous Mike Mogis) create a soft, gentle feel equally inspired by the Brill Building and the Countrypolitan sound of Nashville in the late '50s. The only place the album falters is on the two covers the duo attempt. Deschanel doesn't add much to "You Really Got a Hold on Me," and Ward's backing vocals are just the kind of affected, arch singing she avoids elsewhere. Their take on the Beatles' "I Should Have Known Better" is better but still awfully close to a novelty. The album would have been more successful without both tracks, but even with them stands as a lovely coming out party for Deschanel. If you run screaming at the thought of singing actresses, give She & Him a chance and it might calm your fears. You may even forget the origins of the singer and simply be charmed by the singing, the songs, and the sounds found on Volume One.
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