Haruko
Wild Geese
Label ©  brackenrecords
Release Year  2009
Length  41:58
Genre  Neo Folk
Personal Star Rating [1-5]  
  Ref#  H-0055
Bitrate  ~221 Kbps
  Other  
  Info  
    Track Listing:
      1.  
      Welcome To Loveland  
       3:35  
      2.  
      Spring In Out Lungs  
       3:13  
      3.  
      Man In The Moon  
       3:48  
      4.  
      Autumn, Golden Trees  
       2:54  
      5.  
      The Bright Lights  
       3:17  
      6.  
      Morning Dreams  
       3:55  
      7.  
      The Mountain Adventure  
       7:22  
      8.  
      Winter  
       4:45  
      9.  
      The Dragon's Tears  
       5:25  
      10.  
      Goodbye My Love, Goodbye  
       3:44  
    Additional info: | top
      Don't want to break the 4th wall here but I can't really start reviewing this without mentioning the press release. While most artists fill them with wild claims ('Like the Sex Pistols fighting the Supremes in a sack whilst Beck looks on') , write-ups from the local press ('4/5 - Tewkesbury Advertiser') and shameless name-dropping ('once supported 18 Wheeler' on their 2001 comeback tour'). So to read Susi Stanglow AKA Haruko say, "I really hope you like them because... I am not totally satisfied. I wasn't able to do professional recordings, as you know, so I tried my best with the stuff I had. It was sometimes a little hard since its so cold in my room that i was freezing and there were always noises around so that I had to stop recording sometimes and the mic of my recorder is not so good and - oh my god, so many things" comes as a welcome change.

      Which is all extremely heart-warming, but also a bit concerning when an artist starts apologising for the record before you've even heard it. To be honest she's fretting about nothing. The sounds a little rough but nothing your average Joanna Newsom fan couldn't handle. And if this record was pro-tooled to heck it'd be a crime anyway. And its a 'record' more than anything else. This a record of a girl in a room with an acoustic guitar and while once its stopped playing I'm not sure if I'll have any great urge to ever put it on again, it does a better job of evoking an atmosphere and a moment than any other album I can think of. There are 19 songs here, and each one is a sweet, sad nature-folk ditty. Whats impressive is how it never comes across as saccharine or wilfully twee and whimsical either. Its about as slight and fragile as you ever imagine a record being. I kind of want to give her a hug and tell her its going to be ok.

      Andy Glynn
    Links/Resources | top