James Brown
The Payback
Label ©  Polydor
Release Year  1973
Length  1:12:59
Genre  Funk
Personal Star Rating [1-5]  
  Ref#  J-0094
Bitrate  192 Kbps
  Other  
  Info  
    Track Listing:
      1.  
      The Payback  
       7:39  
      2.  
      Doing The Best I Can  
       7:41  
      3.  
      Take Some... Leave Some  
       8:33  
      4.  
      Shoot Your Shot  
       8:09  
      5.  
      Forever Suffering  
       5:52  
      6.  
      Time Is Running Out Fast  
       12:47  
      7.  
      Stone To The Bone  
       10:14  
      8.  
      Mind Power  
       12:04  
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      Review by Mark Deming

      Originally released in 1973 as a sprawling two-LP set, The Payback was one of James Brown's most ambitious albums of the 1970's, and also one of his best, with Brown and his band (which in 1974 still included Fred Wesley, Maceo Parker, St. Clair Pinckney, Jimmy Nolen and Jabo Starks) relentlessly exploring the outer possibilities of the James Brown groove. Stretching eight cuts out over the space of nearly 73 minutes, The Payback is long on extended rhythmic jamming, and by this time Brown and his band had become such a potent and nearly telepathic combination that the musicians were able pull out lengthy solos while still maintaining some of the most hypnotic funk to be found anywhere, and on the album's best songs -- the jazzy "Time Is Running Out Fast", the relentless "Shoot Your Shot", the tight-wound "Mind Power", and the bitter revenge fantasy of the title cut -- the tough, sinuous rhythms and the precise interplay between the players is nothing short of a wonder to behold. And even the album's lower-key cuts (such as the lovelorn "Doing The Best That I Can" and "Forever Suffering") sink their hooks into the listener and pull you in; quite simply, this is remarkable stuff, and even Brown's attempts at lyrical relevance (which were frankly getting a bit shaky at this point in his career) are firmly rooted enough to sound convincing. The Payback turned out to be one of James Brown's last inarguably great albums before he hit a long fallow streak in the mid-to-late 70's, but no one listening to this set would ever imagine that this was the work of an artist (or a band) about to run out of gas.
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